Monday, July 1, 2013

Intermission IV [End of "D" Part 1, Or: Intermission MCMXXVII]


It has been much slower than before--my last intermission (not counting John's little deviant one) was four months ago. It's been a busy year suddenly--two new jobs, and more hours at one of them than I had at the one I started with when this blog started six months ago, a trip out of town, a new turntable, and a variety of odd occurrences in their own little ways have had their effects on my ability to keep this thing up-to-date. Of course, the addition of many records to my collection as I find new stores, make trips, and feel a collector's passion ignited isn't helping either. You may even notice I have seven artists uncovered in that collage above, and only two of them are singles. Some (Dead Kennedys) I've been looking for, some I've known for a while, and some I've been meaning to look further into than I have--and one was part of my large purchase of records from the Arctic Rodeo label in Germany.

It's a bit of a weird letter, D. It does tend to include an awful lot of metal--dark and death alone start with "D" so it does kind of fall to reason, even if only one of those bears out in my own collection of records. I wouldn't be averse to a copy of Death's Symbolic or Dark Tranquility's The Gallery, but the former has only received narrow European pressings, and the latter is not unreasonable for the various 2xLP etched incarnations, but is a lesser desire. A little more Dead Kennedys would not go amiss (Plastic Surgery Disasters, perhaps--skipping the copy of Frankenchrist I once saw was silly of me), and I occasionally ponder copies of Depeche Mode's Black Celebration and Deep Purple's Fireball when I see them. I could easily rock some Dinosaur Jr. or happily a copy of The Dismemberment Plan's Emergency & I ($75 and up! Somewhat lower and I might be watching it...). I've had an eye on Doomtree's self-titled release for a while, after stupidly passing up on it when it was released. Finding either Drive Like Jehu album would be cool, too--especially snagging a copy of Yank Crime that includes the 7" it originally did!

E's a short letter, unsurprisingly, with a whopping four artists hiding in it, only one of which might be surprising to people who know me--or, at least, unfamiliar. It does happen to contain my most valuable record of all, though--at least, based on what people will apparently pay for a copy!

If you feel like it, take a vote on the first artist to appear under that letter's umbrella: Echo and the Bunnymen, who may, at this point, be most famous for "The Killing Moon", which was already a single, but was also featured in the theatrical cut of Donnie Darko.
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